Maps & Townlands, Placenames – Logainm



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Connectivity
Connectivity is not just about computers and mobile devices talking to each other locally and across the world, it is also about people and where they live and work and also about companies trading locally, nationally and internationally.

[Click on the map icons to expand descriptions]

Our largely rural community is hugely connected regionally, nationally and internationally by virtue of our location.

We are one and a half hours east to Dublin Airport with scheduled flights to 167 destinations: North America (includes ‘border preclearance’ for US-bound passengers), U.K., Europe and the Middle East. (https://www.dublinairport.com)

We are one and a half hours west to Ireland West Airport at Knock, Co. Mayo with scheduled flights to 14 destinations in the U.K. and Europe. (http://www.irelandwestairport.com/destinations)

We are on the Dublin/Sligo railway, accessed at Edgeworthstown station with morning/evening commuter trains to and from Dublin. (www.irishrail.ie)

We are also on the N4 main road from Dublin westward to Sligo and Mayo. The N4 is intersected at Edgeworthstown by the N55 which runs North/South (for example Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh is one and a quarter hours north and Thurles, Co. Tipperary is two hours south).

We have frequent daily bus services from Dublin to Sligo (No. 23) and Dublin to Ballina (No. 22). Edgeworthstown is also served by the Belfast to Galway service. (www.buseireann.ie)

For the commmuter Dublin is a one and a half hour trip. For the business person most of the population centres in the country can be reached within two and a half hours except the South and South West.

Center Parcs Longford Forest is a short twenty five minute drive from us. (http://www.centerparcs.co.uk/en-ie/villages/longford-forest)

Townlands
There are over 64,000 townlands in Ireland. Townlands are the most basic unit of land division. They can range from just a few acres in size to several hundred, particularly in mountainous areas. Prior to their indexing and subsequent publication online at www.census.nationalarchives.ie the original census returns could be accessed only by reference to the 1901 Townland Index.

The townland system is of Gaelic origin, pre-dating the Norman invasion and most have names of Irish Gaelic origin. However, some townland names and boundaries come from Norman manors, plantation divisions or later creations of the Ordnance Survey.

In Ireland, a townland is (generally) the smallest administrative division of land and they form the building blocks for higher-level administrative units such as:
Civil Parishes
Electoral Divisions (in the Republic of Ireland) or Wards (in Northern Ireland)
Baronies
Counties
Provinces
Local, National & European Election Constituencies

Civil parishes are essentially similar to the ancient parishes of the established Church of Ireland. Most Roman Catholic parish boundaries were established in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and are generally larger in area than civil parishes.

For further research go to the Irish Genealogical Research Society website www.irishancestors.ie and the National Library of Ireland website www.nli.ie where parish records of some 300 years of records in over 1,000 Roman Catholic parishes have been digitised and are available to search and view. Check www.townlands.ie for maps of townlands in counties Longford and Westmeath.
 

Longford Tourism
Longford Tourism logo
County Longford, home of the Legend ‘The Wooing of Étain’, is a place of magic, myth and mystery. Steeped in ancient Irish mythology, Longford has several important and impressive heritage sites as well as a wealth of literary and musical tradition. Ancestral home of the Farrell Clan, Longford, historically known as ‘Annaly’ or ‘Anghaile’ is a tranquil and mainly low-lying county, renowned for its angling, boating and outdoor activities. It is ideally located in the heart of the ‘Lakelands and Inland Waterways’ region, making it a perfect place for those with a love of water sports. The recently restored St Mels Cathedral, ‘The Longford Phoenix’, acts as the focal point of Longford town, while ‘The Royal Canal Way’ which meanders for over 146km from Dublin to Longford, provides direct access to the town centre for both walkers and cyclists. Longford’s accessibility to many of Ireland’s main towns and cities make it a prime location as a holiday base. The true beauty of the county lies in its rural charm, the hospitality of its people and the breathtaking views of its quiet countryside of farmland, lakes, bogs and the occasional low hill.

Longford Tourism’s website www.longfordtourism.ie is a great starting point for an exploration of all that County Longford has to offer.

For anyone wishing to trace their family history the genealogy tab is worth reading. It has links to resources that will be useful in researching family records.

Placenames - Logainm - Explanations/Translations
Most placenames in Ireland are anglicisations of the original Irish language name i.e. adaptations of the Irish names to English phonology and spelling. However, some names come directly from the English language and a handful come from Old Norse and Scots. As we travel from west to east we find more of the towlands have English names, a consequence of County Westmeath being heavily planted. The study of placenames in Ireland unveils features of the country’s history and geography, and the development of the Irish language.

Below in the following three sections are the townlands that make up our parishes along with a translation of each and a translation/explanation for many of them. Note that this is a first version and it is hoped to add to it. Should there be any errors or if there are local variations of any of the townland names please e-mail me at cahilljohn23@gmail.com
 

Irish
Gaeilge
English
Bearla
Irish
Gaeilge
English
Bearla
athfordgarránisland,
river meadow
abhainnrivergortfield
beagsmallgleannglen
barrtopglas/glaisegreen, grey, stream
bánwhite, lea ground, grassy
garrángrove
bailetown, townland, homestead
log/laghollow
ardheightleacflat stone or rock,
flagstone
aill/faillcliffleachtgravestone, mound
achadhfieldleathhalf, side
bealachway, passléimleap
binnpeakleitirhillside
bearnagapliathgrey, grey place,
grey horse
bótharroadliosring fort
breacspeckledlochlake
builecattle fold,
summer pasture
machaireplain
bun(river-)mouth,
bottom(-land)
má/ma(i)ghplain
caisealstone ring fortmainistirmonastery
caisleán
castlemínsmooth, mountain pasture
caolnarrow,
a narrow marshy stream
mucpig
carnpile of rocks muieannmill
carraigrockmuinethicket
ceann/cionnhead,
headland
mullachhilltop
ceapach/ceapaighplot of land,
tillage plot
nuanew
cillchurchoileánisland
clochstone,
stone building
páircfield
cluainmeadowpollhole, pool
cnochillportport, bank, fort
coillwoodráthring fort
coraweir, stone fence, fordrinnpoint, headland
dairoakros(wooded) height,
wood, promontory
dairered oneruared, red place
disearthermitagesceachhawthorn, thorn bush
doireoak woodseanold
domhnachchurchsliabhmountain
droicheadbridgeteachhouse
droimridgeteampallchurch, temple
dubhblacktírland
dúnforttobarwell
eanachmarshtócharcauseway
fearannlandtrástrand, beach
fionnwhitetuaimmound. burial place
garbhroughtuarpaddock, (cultivated) field,
pasture
tulachhillock
uachterupper
Source:
http://www.logainm.ie/scoil/pdf/logainm.ie-scoil1-00.pdf
Placenames - Logainm (Edgeworthstown)
 
 

TOWNLANDS IN EDGEWORTHSTOWN PARISH – PARÓISTE MEATHAS TROIM


Edgeworthstown Parish Townlands

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In Mostrim (Edgeworthstown) Civil Parish there are 34 townlands.
In St. Mary’s Edgeworthstown Roman Catholic Parish there are 38 townlands.
The additional four townlands are at the western end of the parish and are Corboy, Ballyhoolivan, Ballynagoshen and Lisnanagh. These are included in Killoe Civil Parish.

Name of TownlandLogainmMeaning of Name
AbbeylandFearann na MainistreachFearann = ploughland
****Probably the abbey was the Fransiscan friary of
St. John the Baptist, Ballynasaggart which was destroyed
by Richard Nugent, Earl of Westmeath in 1651
AghadonaghAchadh Donncha
AughafinAchadh FionnFine field
Ballindagney and
Cullyvore
****Baile an Deagánaigh
agus
An Chúil Mhór (Coill Uí Mhordha?)
Town of the stronghold (Ballindagney)
BallyhoolivanBaile Uí Shúileacháin O'Sullivan's town
BallynagoshenBaile na gCosánachTown of the footmen
BarneAn BhearnaGap
Bracklon****Breac-chluainSpeckled town
or Breac Linn (Speckled pool)
Cam****

CamachA winding
As in a long winding lane
From Cam is derived comma (because it is crooked) used in pronunciation.
Caman, a hurly, a stick with a crooked head. Cambutta, a walking stick.
Camlisk BegCamlaisc BheagCamlisk = Winding of the lazy man
Canlisk MoreCamlaisc Mhór
Clonca****Cluain CathaMeadow of the battle
ClonwhelanCluain FaolainCloonwhelan = Meadow of the seagulls
Corboy*

****
An Chorr Bhuí
A byname composed of the elements corr ‘crane’ + buidhe ‘yellow’
Or Cor Buí = Yellow whin
CorclaraghAn Chorr Chlárach A dyke with plank across
Cranalagh Beg****Crannalach BheagCranalagh = trees or plantations
Cranalagh MoreCrannalach Mhór
CullogeCollógLittle back – one who rides behind another on horseback
Curry*Na Curraithe
Cuirreach or as it is written in modern Irish, currach, has two meanings,
a racecourse and a morass. In it’s first sense it gives name to the Curragh
of Kildare, which has been used as a racecourse from the most remote ages.
In the second sense, which is the more general, it enters into names in the
forms Curra, Curragh and Curry, which are very common through the four provinces -- Joyce (p.463)
EdgeworthstownMeathas Troim - Mostrim
Edgeworthstown or Mostrim
- Meathustruim means the fertile ridge
This place-name is seldom seen except in Church Records. The place
is better known by the name Edgeworthstown, after the Edgeworth family,
who have been living here for the past two or three hundred years.
Maria Edgeworth, a member of this family, wrote well in the English tongue.
About twenty perches to the west of the ruins of the old Abbey (about
which I could gather nothing) is St. Bearach's (Barry) holy well, now
unknown and unheeded. He was the same who lived at Tarmonbarry.
St. Bearach was probably the patron saint of Meathustruim. This parish
is now (I think) under the tutelage of the Blessed Virgin Mary, feast 15th
August. Dr. Healy tells us that every diocesan patron and almost every
parochial saint had his holy well, of which the memory is now sometimes
lost. I believe St. Barry and his holy fountain no longer hold a place
in the memory of the people of Mostrim. Perhaps some pious person reading
this might clear away the choking weeds and grass and place beside the
well some memento of St. Barry. This simple act would revive some
knowledge of the saint and help to perpetuate his memory, unhappily
sinking into oblivion. (p. 180)
GarryandrewGarraí AindriúAndrew's garden
Gneeve*An GníomhThe twelth part of a ploughland
Plowland = a measure of land used in the northern and eastern
counties of England after the Norman conquest based on the area able
to be ploughed in a year by a team of eight oxen
Keelogenasause*Caológ na Sás Narrow ridge of the nets (snares) or engines
Keeloges is the name of about twenty six-townlands scattered all
over Ireland; it means “narrow strips or plots” and the Irish name
is caelóga, the plural of caelóg – Joyce (p.33)
Kilcourcey****Cill Chuairsí Wood of the racecourse
Kilsallagh****Coill SallachDirty wood
or Coitt Saiteac (Coill Saileac), wood of willow-trees
but is more likely Cill Saileach = Church of the Sallow
(willow tree)
Lacken*An LeacainSide of a hill
LiscahillLios CathailCahill's fort
LisnageeraghLios na gCaorachThe fort of the sheep (caera)
LisnagrishLios na Gríosa Fort of the ember
LisnanaghLios na nUamhanach Fort of the troops, cavalry:
or it might mean fort of the apparition -- T. Concannon
LissanoreLios an Óir Fort of the gold
Lissanure*Lios an Iúir Fort of the yew tree
The yew ranked among the chief trees. The Druids regarded it
as sacred, and used it in their ceremonies. Of its timber, which was
very plentiful, vessels were made; it was also much used in the
manufacture of furniture. Red yew looked well in carving and
ornamental work -- Joyce
Longfield*Leamhchoill
The conversion of Choill into Field seems a strange conversion
but every step in the process in accounted for by principles examined
in this and next chapter, namely the conversion of ch into f,
the addition of d after l, and the tendency at present under
consideration namely the alteration of the Irish into an English word
- Joyce (p.32)
d is added after l in the word “field” when this word is an anglicised
form of coill, a wood, as in Longfield, Cranfield
– Joyce (p.39)
MonadarraghMóin na DarachBog of the oaks
RingowneyRinn GhamhnaCalf's division
RinnennyRoinn EithneEnna's division
- O'Donovan
Shantum****An SeantomOld thicket
Sean Tom = old thicket
Tinnynarr****Tigh na nDéarAlso Tigh Na n-Ár
Tinaner = house of the slaughters
e.g. the slaughter of the monks of the Fransiscan friary during
the plantations (see Abbeyland)
 

Sources:
I have used spellings and descriptions as per the originals. In many cases this reflects ancient spellings, pronunciations and customs. In other cases manual transcriptions or digitisation have given rise to misspellings. I have not tried to correct these, rather I feel that they add to the experience of exploration and learning that this exercise engenders.

Primary Source:
PLACE-NAMES OF THE COUNTY LONGFORD
REV. JOSEPH MacGIVNEY
©Dublin:
JAMES DUFFY AND CO. Ltd.,
38 Westmoreland Street.
1908.

Secondary Sources (marked * , ** , *** & ****):

*
THE ORIGEN AND HISTORY OF
IRISH NAMES AND PLACES
P.W. JOYCE
LONGMANS GREEN & CO.
1910

**
IRISH LOCAL NAMES EXPLAINED
P.W. JOYCE
1870

***
http://www.longfordlibrary.ie – Archives & Local Studies tab

****
Edgeworthsthown
Parish of Mostrim
O Theach to Teach
1901 – 2000
Mostrim Heritage and Historical Group
2003

Placenames as gaeilge have been taken from www.townlands.ie

A full list of townlands in County Longford in English and in Irish is contained in:
http://www.ahrrga.gov.ie/app/uploads/2015/07/Longfort_DreachtOL-2012_2.pdf

Additional reading:
http://www.libraryireland.com/Places.php
http://www.irish-place-names.com/meanings/
http://oracleireland.com/books/joyce/names-c.htm
http://oracleireland.com/Ireland/amenities/place-names.htm
https://www.johngrenham.com

Placenames - Logainm (Streete)
 
 

TOWNLANDS IN STREETE PARISH – PARÓISTE AN tSRÁID


Streete:
Anciently called Sraid Mhaighe Breacraigh, i.e. the Street of Moybrackry. This parish occupies the north east corner of the Barony of Ardagh, bordering on Co. Westmeath and lies between the parishes of Granard and Mostrim. It contains 3,377 acres.
 
Street Parish Townlands

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In Street Civil Parish there are 18 townlands plus 35 in Streete Civil Parish.
St. Mary’s Streete Roman Catholic Parish includes all 51 townlands.
St. Mary’s church is in Boherquill townland.

Name of TownlandLogainmMeaning of Name
Aghamore***Achadh Mór Great field
Aghareagh***Achadh RiabhachGrey field
Athenboy
Ballaghgowla
and Froghan
***
***
Bealach Gabhla
agus An Fraochán
Bealach Gabhlach, forked road
Fraochán, bilberry land or land abounding in whortle berries
Ballew
Balloo***Baile Lú Bal Lugha, Lugh's, or Lewy's town
Ballykildevin
Barradrum
Behabane
BoherquillBóthar an Choill
Bottomy
Burgesland
Caherdague***Ceathar Déag
Chancery
ClonavaCluain ??mha
Clonconnell
Clonkeen
ClonmoreCluain Mhór
Cloonshannagh
or Coolamber Manor Demesne
***Cluain Seannach
nó Mainéar Chúil Amra
Lawn or meadow of the foxes
Hill-back of the trough
Coolamber (2) ***Cúil AmraHill-back of the trough
CoolnagunCúil na gCon
Cornacrusk
Correaly
CulvinCut bin (now Culvin, in parish of Street) back of peak -- O’Donovan
Curry**Na CurraitheA form of Curragh, a marsh
Derradd**Doire-fhadaLong oak wood
Drumann***An DromainnA ridge or long hill
Dunamon
Fearmore**Great grass (feur) or grassy place
Freaghmeen**An Fraoch MínFreagh, Freugh, Fraech = heath Mín = fine. Smooth Heath
Garriskill
Gortanear
Hospital Bank
Kilfintan***Cill FhiontainFintan's church
Kilfintan Lower or
Crancam
***Cill Fiontain, Fintan's Church
Crann Cam = croked tree
Kilmore
Kilshallow
Kiltareher
Lechurragh***An LeathchurrachThe half moor
Lisduff***Lios-dubhBlack fort
LismacaffreyLios Mhic Gofraidh
Lisnagappagh
LisryanLios RiainRyan's fort
MilkernaghMiolcarnach
Moatavally***Móta an BhealaighThe moat of the road
Monagead
MoneyhoolaghanMuine Uí ShúileacháinMóin Uí Shúileacháin
O'Sullaghan's bog
QueenslandCoill Fhiontain Bheag
Rath**A circular fort
Tinode
 
Additional note:

Tupperfintan, St. Fintan’s well
Rev. Wm. Monaghan, P.P., Street, put a stop to the Pattern at St. Fintain’s Well about 40 years ago.
— 0′ Donovan who wrote the above about 1837.
This is a holy well in a place called Queensland, parish of Street. Stations are performed at it on the first Sunday of harvest. Of the Saint’s Church no trace now remains. It is traditionally told that the Saint is interred in a small mound, called on the Ordnance Survey Map Kinard (recte, Ceann-drd)* high head; which mound is to be seen on the bank of a rivulet to the east of Lismacaffrey.
The Saint’s holy well was much neglected till the late Mr. Con Fagan, of Lismacaffrey, erected a cross and pailing around it, and left beside it an At), for drinking its pure water.
* ” There was a nunnery called ‘ Kenard,’ on the lands of Clonmore, parish of Street.” — O’Donovan.
 

Placenames - Logainm (Rathowen)
 
 

TOWNLANDS IN RATHOWEN PARISH – PARÓISTE RÁTH EOGHAIN


Rathowen Parish Townlands

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In Rathowen there are two civil parishes.
In Rathowen (Russagh) Civil Parish there are 9 townlands plus 26 in Rathowen (Rathaspick) Civil Parish.
St. Mary’s Rathowen Roman Catholic Parish includes all 35 townlands.

Name of TownlandLogainmMeaning of Name
Ballycorkey
(part of)
Ballydorey
Ballygarran**The town of the garran or shrubbery
Ballygarvey
Ballygarveybeg
Bardanstown
Barratogher
Cappagh*An CheapachA plot of land laid down for tillage
Carrigagh
Clonaboy
Corry
Corrydonnellan
Cross
Crumlin or
Rockfield
**Cruim-ghlinn[Crumlin](Four Masters),
curved glen
Curristeen
Derrydooan LowerDoire Dhubháin ??ochtarach
Derrydooan MiddleDoire Dhubháin Láir
Derrydooan UpperDoire Dhubháin Uachtarach
Henfield
Joanstown
Killinagh
Kilmacahill or
Caraun
Loughanstown
Loughanstown Lower or
Slkievelahan
Mace**Más [Mauce], the thigh, a long low hill
Newpass Demesne
Rathaspick**The fort of the bishop (easpug)
Rathclittagh
RathowenRáth Eoghain
Rathowen (Edward)
RussaghWood of the steeds
This place is in the parish of Rathowen, or rather Russagh
was formerly joined to Rathowen. "MacRustaing, a famous jester,
was buried in Russagh. It is said no woman can look at his
grave without uttering a foolish laugh." -- Kuno Meyer.
MacRustaing was the maternal brother of St. Coemain Brec,
and was probably an ecclesiastic, as he is spoken of as one of
the eight distinguished scholars of Armagh, about the year 740.
St. Coemain Brec, Abbot of Roseach, died 14th September, 615 A.D.
— Dr. Todd.
There are at Russagh the ruins of an old church and graveyard,
also a mount on which grows a bush said to be the centre of Ireland
-- O’Donovan.
The horse. We have several words for a horse,
the most common are each and capall. Each [agh] is found in
several families of languages; the old Irish form is ech;
Each is very often found at the beginning of names, contrary
to the usual Irish order and in this case it generally takes
the modern form of augh. For example Aughinish, an
anglicisation of Each-inis (Four Masters), horse island.
In the end of names it commonly forms the postfix -agh;
as in Russagh in Westmeath, which the Four Masters write
Ros-each, the wood of horses
– Joyce (p.474)
Stongaluggaun
Windtown
Windtown North
Windtown South